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DEDICATION 



OP 



franklin mi P^to^hII CwIIejt 



LANCASTER, PA., MAY 16th, 1856. 



INTRODUCTORY 

BT 

E. y. GERHART, PRESIDENT. 

> 

ADDRESS 

BT 

EMLEK FRANKLIN, Esq. 



CHAMBEBSBUBG, PA. : 

PRINTED BY M. KIEPPBR A CO. 

1856. 



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CORRESPONDENCE. 

BxLiH Frahklhi, Esq.^ 

Dear Sir : At a meeting of the Faenlty of Frank- 
lin and Marshall College, held this morning immediately after the dedicatory 
exercises, the folloiring resolution was nnanimonsly adopted, whioh, at their 
reqnest, I haye the pleasure of transmitting to you. 

Sesolved, That the Faoulty of Franklin and Marshall College tender their 
cordial thanks to Emlen Franklin, Esq., for his excellent and appropriate ad- 
dress deliyered at the dedication of the new edifice this morning, and respect- 
fully request a -copy of the same for publication. 
Very Respectfully Yours, 

THEODORE APPLE, 



Franklin and Marshall College, \ 
Lancaster, Pa., May 16, '66. / 



Sec'y. pro tern, of the Faculty. 



Lancastbb, Pa., May 17tii, 1866. 
Dear Sir .'—I beg leaye to return my grateful acknowledgments to the 
Faculty of Franklin and Marshall 'College, for the flattering resolution con- 
tained in yourcommunication of yesterday. 

Li compliance with their wishes, I herewith titinsmit a copy of the address 
referred to, regretting at the same time, that it is not more worthy of the 
•cause and of the occasion. 

Very Rei^^ectfiilly Tours, 

EMLEK FRANEXIN. 
P^t Theodore Apple, Sec'y. pro tem. of the Faculty of F. & M. C. 



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INTRODUCTORY. 



The consolidation of Franklin CoHege and Marshall College 
constitutes a new era in the history of these two Institutions. 
No other event occurring since they were established, is equal- 
ly deserving of such distinction ; for it introduced a new order 
of things, giving a new phase and new power to all their edtt-^ 
cational operations. It was the point of confluence for two 
homogeneous streams, at which they begin to mingle their 
waters and pour them down through the valley of time in one 
deeper, broader, more majestic channel. 

Nearly three years have now elapsed since the formal open- 
ing of the Institution at Lancaster, was publicly celebrated. 
During this period its course has b^en steadily progressive. 
Unpropitious circumstances, indeed, have not been wanting. 
The removal of Marshall College, and its union with Franklin 
College, may be aptly compared to the transplanting of a 
young tree. It is put into a new soil. It occupies a new po- 
sition. Some of the roots have been^ brtused and broken. The 
nutritive earth has not settled nicely around all the fibres. 
The north-west wind seems to blow upon it from a different 
point of the compass. Some of the destructive insects that 
buzz around it, or fasten on its leaves, or sting its trunk, maj 
be of larger size or infuse a more poisonous venom. A little 
time is necessary, therefore, to recover from the first effects of 
a sudden transition, and appropriate, by a vigorous process of 
assimilation, the superior elements of life from the new, rich 
soil in which it stands. 

Like this has been the experience of the new Institution. 
The old home was given up ; the new home was indeed the 
ancient abode of education, but still new to her. Old currents 
of influence and support, were interrupted ; new and stronger 
ones had to be started. Old ties were broken> and the charm 



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of old associations had vanished; new ties were therefore to be 
formed, and she had to wait on old Time to wave his wand and 
throw the charm of other associations around her new halls 
and new grounds. There were warm friends, indeed, in her 
adopted home, but they were such rather from principle and 
resolution ; she had to be seen, an4 heard, and handled, that 
their hearts m^ht become warmer still from affection and in- 
terest. Confidence, affection and earnest zeal for her pro- 
gress on the part of her new guardians, friends and patrons, 
could not spring up at will or in a moment. Nothing was 
more natural, therefore, than that the Institution should feel 
sensibly the effects of the great change. Yet the tree grew. 
Some of the limbs may have appeared less thrifty, and some 
of the leaves may have gotten yellow ; but it did not die ; it 
lived on — ^it budded, blossomed and bore fruit in its season, 
and though the crop may not have been as large as on some 
former years, still the fruit was ripe and good. Long may 
the tree stand and thrive, spreading its branches wider, lifting 
its top higher, and with each returning summer enriching the 
State and the land with a golden harvest. May coming gen- 
erations sit in its shadow and rejoice in its strength ; and may 
the nations of the earth rise up and call it blessed. 

To-day we have assembled to inaugurate the first epoch in 
the history of Franklin and Marshall College. The liberal 
contributions of Lancaster city and county have purchased 
these broad, beautiful acres that spread at our feet on either 
side, and erected this chaste and substantial structure to serve 
the wants of the Institution. It is becoming to distinguish the 
day with appropriate ceremonies — ^to suspend the daily routine 
of study, recitation and lecture — ^to turn aside from the ordi- 
nary affairs of business — to come together within these walls, 
to invoke the benediction of the triune God, to reflect serious- 
ly upon the great interests of Literature and Science, and to 
contemplate the intimate relation of Education to the weal or 
wo of society. It is becoming to set this new edifice apart, 
solemnly and formally, to the glorious and sacred cause for 
which it has been erected. For the work to which it is devoted 
forms the bone and sinew of the State, and gives color to the 
life-blood of the Church. 



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Here scores and hundreds of youth >f ill congregate from year 
to year. They will come from the north and the south, from 
the east and the west, from the city and the country, from the 
valleys and the mountains, each one with habits and opinions 
of his own, modified by the place of his birth and the character 
of his early companions. They will come from the families of 
the intelligent and ignorant, of the rich and the poor ; some 
from the proud and ambitious, others from the modest and 
humble, each one with plans and views of life varying with the 
atmosphere of the parental fireside. They will come, some 
with strong and others with feeble minds, some with industrious, 
simple and moral habits, others with indolent, luxurious and 
immoral habits ; some with noble hearts, calm, bright hopes 
and a firm will, and others there may be who will lack all the 
better and purer susceptibilities of our nature. To this spot 
they will come as to a common centre, acting and reacting on 
each other, mind striking against mind, will winning or resist- 
ing will, and heart repelling or attracting heart, each one giv- 
ing an impulse to, and exerting some peculiar influences upon, 
the life of the community. Some old habits will be laid aside, 
some old friendships dissolved, some old ties broken^ here new 
habits will be contracted, here new, warm and lasting friend- 
ships will spring up, here soul will be bound to soul by ties that 
neither age nor death can break. 

Above, before and in this apparent confusion of moral for- 
ces, must be the internal vivifying spirit and the all-embracing 
atmosphere of the College itself — a strong, general spirit that, 
working gently, silently, but potently, assimilates to its own 
nature the various minds and repugnant tendencies that are 
here brought into contact — a spirit that gives due harmonious 
durection to the collection of contradictory aspirations and 
aimless pursuits, and breathes unity and order into the numer- 
ous conflicting capacities, facilities and talents of the whole 
mass of mind — an atmosphere that each student inhales, im- 
parting the life-sustaining oxygen to the blood flowing through 
the arteries of his immaterial being — an atmosphere that re- 
fracts equally all the rays of intellectual light that emanate 
from the innumerable stars and moons and suns shining upon 



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ii8| whether dimly or brilliantly, in the sublime, resplendent 
firmament of Literature and Science. The spirit and atmos- 
phere of the Institution will mould every susceptible mind into 
some degree of likeness to itself. Each mind will receive a 
mark, if ardent and impressible, a broad mark, which no fric- 
tion from the action of will, nor the wear and tear of ruthless 
time, can ever utterly efface or destroy. From year to year, 
young men will go forth from these halls, with habits of thought 
and feeling, with principles of action, whose influence will be 
traceable through the whole course of their future life, wheth- 
er they move the plane, or follow the plough, or minister at 
the bedside, or plead at the bar, or officiate at the altar. 

With what intense interest will not, therefore, every reflect- 
ing, conscientious father, and every tender, affectionate moth- 
er, turn their eyes to this spot, and follow in imagination the 
daily movements and progress of a beloved son. The chords 
struck here do not only resound in our ears, but they extend 
their vibrations even to thousands of warm responsive hearts 
scattered over our land. The name, and honor, and joy of the 
distant family, is wrapped up with the work of the College — 
with the influences concentrated in this edifice. Every family 
is directly affected by the intellectual process going forward 
here. Nor is it unknown nor unfelt. Hither many anxious 
thoughts wander, in the morning as soon as the eye opens upon 
the light of day, or at etening, when a book, a vacant chair, 
or a daguerreotype, reminds the fond parental heart of an ab- 
sent son, or during the quiet solemn hours of midnight when a 
painful dream has driven sleep far, far away. how many 
'earnest prayers mingled with tears, go up, and will go up, to 
the Throne of God, for special protection, guidance and bles- 
Bing, in behalf of those who shall be collected in this building. 

With what deep concern should not also the community in 
general, look upon this centre of moral influences. Men will 
go forth from these classic shades to enter and labor in all the 
vocations of life. The State will recceive some of her Le^- 
lators. Judges and various other office-holders from these halls. 
Public eeatiment, than which no human agency is more pow- 
erful in its bearing upon the welfare of society, will be meas- 



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urably determined by the nature and spirit of the instractions 
imparted in this College, The Church, too, will be vitally 
affected. Many of her Ministers, office-bearers and laymen, 
are to be trained here. She will feel the power of her litera- 
ry institutions in the general spirit pervading her ministry, in 
the exposition of the sacred Scriptures, in the tone of thought 
and feeling regulating the action of the various members of 
her mystical body. Neither Church nor State can be indifferent 
to the kind of power put forth by such an Institutions-can 
be indifferent to the use to which this costly structure shall be 
devoted for years and scores of years to come. 

How many vital interests cluster around this new edifice ! 
How solemn the work to be performed here from one decade 
of years to another ! How far-reaching and inflexible its in- 
fluence ! 

In the name of the Board of Trustees and the Faculty, 
in the name of every family whose happiness is linked with 
the transactions of! to-day, in the name of the community and 
the State, and in the name of the Church of Jesus Christ, we 
do therefore dedicate this building, solemnly and forever, to 
sound Learning, to profound, liberal, comprehensive and true 
Science, to the spirit of refinement and of general social cul- 
ture, to the fair genius of private, and public virtue, to the sa- 
cred cause of honor, truth and religion, and to the highest in- 
terests of the community and the State, the nation, the Church 
and the world. Let it stand, the object of sincere affection 
and unchangeable regard, to elevate, dignify and purify man 
in all the relations of life, and bring glory to God, the Father, 
Son and Holy Qhost, throughout countless generations yet 
unborn. 



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ADDRESS. 



The condition of the general intelligence aronnd nd has so 
obvious and powerful an effect upon our own individual com- 
fort and happiness, that any great movement in its behalf pro- 
duces in us a spontaneous interest and regard. We all feel, 
that if every man and every woman in the community could 
be induced to seize, with an abiding zeal, upon all the means 
of knowledge within their reach, if they would diligently ap- 
propriate all the materials for mental improvement which sur- 
rounding circumstances have placed in their daily pathway, 
the pleasure of social intercourse would be vastly enhanced, 
many unfortunate distinctions would be obliterated, and the 
general aspect of society would be greatly improved. If, in 
addition to this, each individual would, with honest heart and 
pure intentions, conscientiously endeavor to make such mental 
acquisitions conducive to the welfare of his friends, his family, 
and his race, according to the measure of his abilities and the 
influence of his position, how many miseries would be abolish- 
ed, how much the area of general happiness would be enlarged, 
and the dignity of existence exalted ! 

Many a philanthropic heart has throbbed with the desire- 
many a fond schemer has labored with the hope of assisting in 
the accomplishment of such a result. But the attainment of 
a state of universal mental and moral excellence, realizing thi& 
ideal standard, is practically impossible. We are glad to be- 
lieve that the wish to know is innate to every mind. But 
the desire of eminent mental culture is not generally so strong 
a feeling of our nature as to successfully resist and overcome 
the force of adverse circumstances. It lives a spark in every 
human breast, which constant food and care will cherish to a 
bright and steady flame, but whose frail existence is endanger* 
ed by the presence of many enemies, banded together for its 
destruction. Indolence chills it with its cold and noisome 
breath ; unpropitious fate smothers it beneath a weight of cares ; 



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and despair finally extinguisheff the sacred fire. The difficul- 
ties in the way of the attainment of knowledge are obvions, 
palpable ; while its rewards are slow, distant and indistinct ; 
consequently, the lower men are in the scale of intelligence, 
the less is the value they assign to it ; and it is precisely those 
to whom it is the greatest need, whom it is most difficult to 

V convince of their necessitous condition. Thus a great portion 
of mankind remain careless, or become desponding ; and are 
content to bury their one talent in the earth, because it is but 
one, instead of being stimulated by the smallness of their pos- 
session to that exertion which is necessary to increase their 
store. 

Moreover, moral improvement does not always keep pace 
with the development of mind, nor is the possession of eminent 
mental attainments, always accompanied by the determination 
to dedicate them to the welfare and benefit of mankind. Each 
one of UB, within the limits of his own observation, may re- 
call instances in which he has seen noble talents and acquire- 
ments prostituted to the basest and most ignoble ends, and be- 
yond and above our own limited experiences, history has re*- 
corded many melancholy lessons to the same effect. It is an 
unnecessary, as it would be an unpleasant task, to linger long 
over examples of historical characters, blessed with every at- 
tribute of genius and learning, who not only refused to employ 
their splendid faculties for the advancement of the general 
welfare, but who seemed actuated by an insane desire to de- 
tract from the happiness and deepen the degradation of human 
nature. Yet, perhaps, it is fit to pause for a moment over the 
character of one, whose existence discloses to our view, a more 
vivid picture of mental excellence, combined with moral de* 
pravity, than the imagination could have conceived. To know 
that men have lived, who, from evil passions, culpable ambition, 
or other unworthy motives, have carried fire and sword, mise- 
ry and desolation, over smiling countries and happy nations, 
is melancholy indeed. But the heart trembles with a deeper 

and more instinctive horror, in approaching one, who, in the 
calm retirement of a private station, amid the placid influences 

of a Uterary Hfe, could meditate an attack on public virtue and 

happiness^ plan a vast conspiracy against the well being of 



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xaankind, and devote the energies of -a long life^ and a Hepcu- 
lean mind^ to the monstrous enterprise. Yet such was Vol- 
taire. Endowed with the most consummate natural abilities, 
with remarkable powers of wit and sarcasm^ and with these 
natural advantages adorned by an assiduous mental culture, 
and extensive stores of learning, Voltaire was fitted to exert 
a vast and durable influence over the minds of men. He 
might have secured a proud position in the temple of fame. 
He might have won a name illustrious as the benefactor of his 
race. But instead of a blessing he preferred to be a curse. 
Evil seemed to be his good, and good his evil. He scorned 
and despised human nature ; he hated his fellow men with a 
malignant hatred ; and the sole purpose of his life appeared to 
be, to wage an unceasing war against the best interests of 
mankind. He labored to prove that private or public virtue 
had no existence. He undertook to destroy Christianity ; and 
he endeavored to root out from the regard and respect of 
mankind all that is endearing and lovely in human nature, 
everything that could make life desirable, or the thought of 
death endurable. Himself the fittest exemplar of the doctrinea 
he inculcated, he struggled to pull down the world to the lev- 
el of his own depravity, and he wielded his powers with such 
terrible energy as to partially produce that efiect. To him, 
and the band of conspirators of which he was the creator and 
acknowledged chief, are in a great measure to be attributed 
the iniquities which preceded, and the crimes and miseries 
which attended the progress of the French Revolution ; and 
the seeds of evil then sown broadcast over the world, will, 
perhaps, continue to germinate and fructify for ages yet to 
come. With unflagging zeal Voltaire continued to prosecute 
his fell purpose during a career of more than ordinary dura- 
tion, to its final dose. But in the dread hour of his own dis- 
fiolution, that distorted reason which was his boast and pride, 
deserted him in the crisis of his need, flying before the strong- 
er powers of an outraged conscience ; and the story of t}ie ter- 
rors of that bed of death, long concealed and suppressed, but 
at length given to the world, furnishes the most complete and 
eloquent vindication of the eternal truths which he vainly la- 
bored to destroy. 



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In addition to other individaal examples of similar charac- 
ter, history famishes ns a singular instance of a system of 
mental culture, whose effects upon human happiness were, if 
not unfavorable, at least positirely barren. I refer to what ia 
popularly known as the scholastic philosophy of the Middle 
Ages. It would be going entirely beyond the limits of the 
present occasion to enter upon an examination of the funda- 
mental principles of this system, and an exposure of its radi- 
cal defects. Its results to the cause of true wisdom, its influ- 
ence upon civilization and general progress, are the only ob- 
jects which demand our present attention. For many centuries 
it held undisputed sway over the literary world, and was the 
single channel through which flowed the genius, wit, and learn- 
ing of the age. It was an era characterized by great mental 
activity, and illustrated by some eminent names in the records 
of literature. But such were the baneful and confining influ- 
ences of the system, that, in all that long period, hardly one 
valuable truth, scarcely one permanent law of animate or inan- 
imate nature, owed its discovery and application to the purpo- 
ses of mankind, to the founders or the followers of this scholas- 
tic philosophy. It was a tree prodigal of foliage, but barren 
of fruit. Immured within the secluded walls of the cloister, 
its disciples there enjoyed a monopoly of the knowledge then 
possessed by the world, and long successfully endeavored to 
prevent its rays from spreading beyond the same narrow lim- 
its. And being thus separated in a measure from communion 
with their fellow creatures, they felt no sympathy with their 
wants and necessities, and esteemed it beneath the dignity of 
learning to cause it to minister to the physical or political good 
of man. Busied from first to last, with subjects which had not 
the remotest connection with the discovery of useful truth, or 
the advancement of the general welfare, they exhausted great 
erudition and the most admirable dialectical skill in their in- 
vestigations, and have left, as the monument of their labors, a 
vast pile of discussion and angry controversy, which has sub- 
served no other useful purpose, but to exhibit at the same time, 
the greatness and the littleness of the human intellect. If, 
instead of spending lives of toil, and filling ponderous tomes 
with disquisitions on topics without substance or profit, these 



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Tepresentatiyes of the learning of the age, had given but a 
portion of that labor to the investigation of the social and po- 
litical evils vhich then oppressed the nations, and the exten- 
sion of the dominion of man over the forces of nature, the 
greatest reproach that has ever fallen upon the cause of learn- 
ing would have been avoided, and the world would have been 
much further advanced in its onward march of civilization and 



In their hands knowledge appeared as a beauteous princess, 
suflFering under the spell of a cruel necromancy. Snatched 
away from the enjoyment of the homage and devotion of her 
loyal subjects, and locked in an enchanted castle, whose gates, 
barred by a magic charm, remained impassible to human steps, 
and only opened at the waiving of the magician's wand ; with 
her fair form changed to some monstrous shape, and her very 
nature altered by the power of the charm, helpless and power- 
less, her only resource was to bewail her captivity , and pray 
for the coming of the gallant knight whose prowess was fated 
to deliver her from her hated thrall. Long and dreary were 
the years of her oppression. But at length the destined 
champion appeared, armed with a more potent spell. With a 
blast of his charmed trumpet he summoned the oppressor to 
the combat, and at the sound the castle tottered to its founda* 
tions, and the spell bound gates flew open. With sword and 
battle axe he felled the dread magician to the earth, and led 
forth the ransomed captive, amid the acclamations of her joy- 
ous people, and arrayed in all her pristine loveliness, to her 
proper throne. 

To Francis Bacon, more than any other name, is the world 
indebted for its complete escape from the trammels of this drea- 
ry philosophy. His genius first detected and demonstrated 
its utter worthlessness for the discovery of new truth. Ho 
showed it to be merely a repository of old knowledge, not a 
nursery of new; and he condemned it as turning to a stagnant 
water, what should always remain a living spring. He pro- 
claimed that the only test of the purity of the motive for ac- 
quiring knowledge, and of the value of knowledge when ac- 
quired, was the production of works for the benefit and use of 
man ; and that as the old philosophy had proved itself inappli- 



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cable to such purposes, it 'vras necessary to build up a new 
system of knowledge, laid on other foundations and raised with 
different materials. In our day it requires no argument to 
enforce such plain principles. The mere statement of the 
proposition carries conviction with it. But in that era of 
comparative darkness and prejudice, it required a long and 
arduous struggle with its adherents, to accomplish the destruc* 
tion of the old fabric, and the institution of a new philosophy, 
adapted to inquiries into the hidden truths and universal laws 
of nature. But Bacon's final victory was complete ; andun« 
der the stimulus of his doctrines and new methods of investi- 
gation, human inquiry was at length directed into an entirely 
new channel. Old subjects of dispute and discussion were 
dropped as unworthy of attention ; and "with a strong persua- 
sion that the whole world was full of secrets, of high moment 
to the happiness of man," the disciples of the new philosophy 
applied themselves zealously to the task of their discovery. 
From that moment only can science be said to have had a true 
existence ; and the long array of blessings which has followed 
in her train, is the legitimate result of the revolution in philos- 
ophy accomplished by Lord Bacon. Others who preceded 
him may have assisted in the good work by crippling its de- 
fences and weakening its foundations ; but to him we owe the 
complete demolition of the edifice, where knowledge drooped, 
a pining captive in a gloomy prison, and the construction of 
a new and majestic temple, where she now sits, a crowned 
queen upon a glorious throne. 

The contemplation of this beneficial revolution in the history 
of learning, naturally inclines us to hasten to the brighter as- 
pects of the picture, upon whose darker colors we have thus 
bestowed a glance. These require no close examination for 
their detection, no studied explanation for their appreciation. 
The beauties of the scene lie patent to the eye, and steal spon- 
taneously to the heart of the most careless observer. In truth 
we have been but watching the shadows, which ever and anon, flit 
across the^ surface of the landscape, while beneath our eyes 
extends a succession of gorgeous woodlands, flowing streams 
and waving fields of grain, clad in all the splendors of a fertile 
beauty, and smiling in the radiance of a summer sun. 



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No man at th» day yentnres to discourage efforts for the 
wider difiiision of the higher branches of knowledge, because 
universal education is impracticable. All human attempts and 
aspirations are mere approximations to ideal standards of ex* 
cellence. In no department of exertion is absolute perfection 
attainable. In every direction, man is constantly approach* 
ing but never reaches the perfect standard; but to cease all 
efforts thereto, for this reason, would be to put a stop to hu* 
man progress in every quarter. It is our destiny to struggle 
upward, upward, (m an endless and limitless ascent, but from 
the high places of the mountains, as well as in the lowly val- 
leys at their base, resounds the same incessant cry, which is 
the natural utterance of aspiring humanity — " Excelsior." 

To the pioneers and early advocates of the cause of general 
education, the prospect might well appear discouraging, and 
the difficulties insuperable. Even partial success must have 
appeared chimerical to all but the most enthusiastic minds. 
But to us who witness what has already been effected, who 
have seen the giant strides which society has made in this re- 
spect since the first faint impulses were communicated, no pro- 
ject seems too extensive or visionary for accomplishment, no 
limits too distant or comprehensive to be reached. Every 
year adds to the number of the means and instruments for the 
more general development of mind. Every succeeding gener- 
ation increases the proportion of those, for whom fortune and 
favorable circumstances have placed those means within easy 
reach ; and each generation multiplies the number of those 
resolute souls, whose fortitude no difficulties can conquer, 
whose ardor no despondency can abate, but who successfully 
struggle upward against the pressure of an untoward fate, to 
the highest eminences of the realm of mind.; not only realizing 
their own highest aspirations, but illuminating by the bright- 
ness of their example, the darkened footsteps of others follow- 
ing in the same paths. From the operation of these happy 
influences, and their tripple reaction upon each other, the ob* 
stacles in the way of the acquirement of knowledge have been 
rendered so much less formidable, and the determination to 
overcome them so much more prevalent, that the ranks of in- 
telligent- and educated men now embrace a very large propor- 



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tion of the memlers of every civilized community. When we 
reflect that but two centuries ago, the masses of mankind 
were shut out from even the first rudiments of knowledge, and 
when we consider that now, in our own favored land at least, a 
fair degree of education and intelligence is the general rule, 
and entire ignorance the rare exception, what golden visions 
may we not indulge in for the immediate future ; how can we 
resist er refuse an interest in that spirit of progress, which^ 
pressing forward far beyond these limits, now directs its efforts 
to the establishment of institutions, which will oonvey oppor- 
tunities for the highest mental culture within the reach of alL 
In no field of philanthropic ^oiterprise, does labor offer so rich 
of so certain prospects of reward as in this. In many of the 
forms in which the progressive spirit of the present age mani- 
fests itself, the pleasure of the work is alloyed. by the uncer- 
tainty of success or the ambiguity of its results, whether for 
good or eviL But in cherishing this interest ; in fostering and 
encouragbg progress in this direction, we may enjoy the assu- 
rance, which is a source of the highest gratification to a be- 
nevolent mind, that any measure of influence oxerted or labor 
expended in this behalf, however small or great, will inevitably 
yield a proportionate return of benefits and advantages to hu- 
manity. 

That the interests of learning are identical with the best in- 
terests of mankind, is no longer a subject of dispute. We 
cannot look around us in our daily walk-r-we cannot open the 
records of time, without being impressed with the evidence of 
these truths; that ^^ the world is a vast theatre constituted for 
exertion ; in which enjoyment is the natural consequence of 
industry, morality and intelligence ; and suffering, that of ig- 
norance and sloth ;'' and that in its history the gradual en- 
largement and diffusion of the mass of knowledge, has been 
steadily followed by an increase and expansion of human hap- 
piness. The ages of general ignorance have been the ages of 
general depravity, misery and oppression ; while the age of 
general intelligence and education is also the age of public 
virtue, security and felicity. Indeed, until within a compara- 
tively recent period, the history of modern nations presents us 
.nothing but a dismal picture of human folly, wretchedness and 



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crime ; an almost unbroken record of war, rapineydisorder and^ 
desolation, from the contemplation of which w'e tnrn with a 
disgust hardly mitigated by the splendid careers of the heroes, 
statesmen and patriots, with which its pages are emblazoned. 
Bnt the era of the re¥iyal of learning was like the dawning of 
a new day npon the world. The dark clotid vrhictv overhung 
the whole aspect of human affairs, fled before the brightness 
of that morning sun. With every ray that pierced the misty 
veil, some common evil was dissipated^ some common blessing 
Was unfolded ; and from the time that, mounting towards the 
zenith, the full splendor of its beams shone forth, history be- 
comes the chronfele of a different order of events. Inspired 
With new emotions of pleasure and delight, we trace upon its 
glowing pages the development of the idea of the common 
brotherhood of humanity, and a consequent perceptioa of the 
blessings of peadd and commercial intercourse ; the birth and 
growth of liberty; the first emergence, the struggles and the 
establishment of the doctrifie of natural rights ; and the sub* 
jection of the laws of matter to the dominion and control of 
man ; yoking then> one by one to his triumphal car^ as th# 
servants of his plealBure and the ministers to His prosperity ; 
until he finally appears as a new being, clothed with higher at- 
tributes of power, and increased capacities for happiness. 

All the sons of men within the limits of the civilised world 
are, in some Measure, participants in these beneficent results* 
And this universality of the blessing is attributable in a great 
degree, to the two-fold influence which mental culture exerts 
upon individual character. It not only adds a chaim to the 
existence of its recipient, by enlarging his command over phy- 
sical comforts, and opening new sources of enjoyment in intel- 
lectual pleasures ; but it reflects these advantages upon the 
world at large, by impressing him with the wiUj as weU as the 
power, to advance the welfare of his felloW-tnen. Mental ex- 
cellence is generally illustrated and ennobled by a philan- 
thropic spirit. ^Hiat spirit stimulates the labors of the votary 
of science in his laboratory, the artist in his studio, the man^ 
of letters in his closet. And although the annals of learning 
j&upply us with many instances to the contrary, some of which 
have engaged our momentary attention ; yet on the other hand^ 



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the long and brilliant array of names^ illustrious in all the de- 
partments of science, art and literature, who have songht the 
highest reward of a life of benevolent labor, in the legacy of 
benefits which they have bequeathed to posterity, evinces the 
almost universal application of the principle, that benevolence 
and the desire of an honorable fame are the natural consequen- 
ces of the development of mind. In the great and perpetual 
conflict between good and evil, of which the world is the battle 
ground, the forces of knowledge are irrevocably enlisted in be- 
half of the general welfare. Some of her disciples have viewed 
the contest with indifference ; others have deserted the good 
cause and endeavored to betray it into the hands of its ene- 
mies ; but the great body of her followers compose a vast army, 
which has constantly borne forward its standard, and marched 
from victory to victory over the enemies of the rights, the lib- 
erties and the happiness of mankind. 

I have thus endeavored to represent the popularization^ if I 
may so term it, of intelligence, as the great lever of material 
progress and social Improvement. To give prominence to the 
idea that it is not the mere possession of a greater amount of 
scientific truth, but it is the application of that truth to prac- 
tical purposes and the number of minds to which it has pene- 
trated ; it is, in fine, the dissolution of the old exclusive priest- 
hood of learning, and the diffusion of its essence through the 
whole current of common life and every day affairs, which 
marks the superiority of the present age, and gives life in the 
nineteenth century a dignity and glory which it never before 
attained. It is not the simple passage of the Nile across the 
plains of Egypt, as it carries its turbid stream along its proper 
channel to the unfathomable sea, which constitutes it the praise 
and blessing of the land. But, when swollen with its annual 
flood, it rolls along its yast volume of waters, laden with the 
seeds of life and sources of fertility, and bursting from its 
narrow banks, pours its rich tide over the parched and burn- 
ing soil; then it is that its genial influences are manifested in 
the conversion of those desert sands into a glad succession of 
smiling meadows and cultivated fields. So the flood of knowl- 
edge, breaking forth from its ancient channel, and spreading 
over the whole surface of the mental world, has changed the 



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blauk desert of human existence into a fair garden^ bloombg 
in its beantj and plentiful in its fruitfalness. 

I am confident that this attempt, however humble and im- 
perfect in its character, will not be deemed inappropriate to 
the present occasion, upon which we have assembled to cele- 
brate the final installation in our midst of a new institution of 
learning. My theme points, with Unerring certainty, to an in- 
crease of the opportunities of thorough collegiate instruction, 
as the end to which a truly philanthropic spirit of progress 
should direct its efforts. As an instrument, therefore, which 
promises to exert a powerful influence for the fbrther diffusion 
of intelligence through the mind of the rising generation, and 
for the transmission of its blessings with increased lustre to 
posterity, I congratulate the community on the final establish- 
ment of Franklin and Marshall College. It is not as an ad- 
dition of one more to the numerous colleges of the State that 
the opening of these spacious halls deserves our countenance 
and regard. The multiplication of colleges is a very diffierent 
thing from that increase of the opportunities of thorough 
collegiate instruction which the wants and requirements of the 
times demand. The building up of so many petty colleges 
throughout the limits of Pennsylvania has been a positive 
drawback to the development of its intellectual resources in 
their highest character. Without adequate means for the em* 
ployment of a competent body of accomplished teachers, or for 
the acquisition of the apparatus necessary for a thorough in- 
struction, they drag out at best a languishing existence, filling 
rather, under the dignified name of colleges, the office of acad- 
emies, for the tuition of the youth of the immediate communi- 
ties in which they are located. By their very number they 
have prevented any one of them from acquiring that wide 
spread respect and confidence which are essential to the sup- 
port of a great institution of learning, thus dissipating resour- 
ces, which, if concentrated, would have Sufficed for the per- 
manent establishment of one institution, which could make a 
decided impression upon the age, and give a distinctive char- 
acter to the mental cultre of Pennsylvania. It is because 
Franklin and Marshall College affords a fair prospect of ac- 
complishing this centralization, of concentrating in some de* 



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21 

gree upon itself these resources, now scattered, and isolated, 
and of attracting the support and affection of the great body 
of the citizens of the Commonwealth, that this occasion 
claims our special interest and favor. Apart from the present 
energetic and efficient administration of its affairs, the funda- 
mental idea upon which the whole structure rests united with 
the advantages of its location, give promise of the realization 
of this high destiny. If ever the generic mind of Pennsylva- 
nia, is to acquire a healthy, vigorous and complete develop- 
ment, it mii9t be by a mode of culture peculiar to itself, and 
corresponding with the origin and special characteristics of 
our population. In the colleges of New England, we see an 
order of education whlsh harmonizes with, and reflects in 
every respect, the origin, the habits of thought, and the consti- 
tutional characteristics of the people of New England. And 
for this reason they have gained a support, and consequent 
influence and celebrity, superior to any others in this country. 
Sut, though the effects of their order of education upon the 
general intelligence of those states, is such as upon comparison 
with ourselves, to call a blush upon the cheek of a Fennsylva- 
nian ; yet it is not by a slavish imitation of their methods that 
our marked inferiority can be overcome. That mode of cul- 
ture, exactly followed here, as it has generally been, will never 
succeed in developing to their highest point the intellectual 
resources of Pennsylvania. Any institution which aspires to 
the high place of being the leader and exponent of that devel- 
opment, must exhibit in its own organization, the constitution- 
al differences which distinguish our population from that of 
other States of the Union. Our Commonwealth, is pre-emi- 
nently a German State. It is stamped in every part with the 
impress of the Germaji cliaracter of its people. So great a 
proportion of its citizens is of German descent, so large a part 
of its fertile territory and personal wealth is in German hands, 
that their national characteristics and habits of thought have 
exercised a preponderating influence on its public and social 
character and conduct. Any order of education, therefore, 
which takes no account of this peculiarity in our condition, 
which ignores the existence of this element, is not the proper 
order for Pennsylvania. The stubborn prejudices of our Ger- 



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22 

man citizens against tlie cause of education, have been noto- 
rious, and the fact that to their mental lethargy has been just- 
ly attributed the failure of Pennsylvania to keep up with her 
sister States in the race of intelligence, not only exhibits the 
extent of their influence upon her position and character, but 
proves the necessity of appealing to their peculiar interests 
and affections, in order to achieve eminent success in any 
movement in the cause of mental culture which is intended to 
effect the whole State. It is well ascertained that those pre- 
judices are fast disappearing, and that the German mind in 
our midst is becoming every day more and more awakened to 
the necessity and advantages of Knowledge ; and the great 
desideratum now is, the establishment of some noble institution 
of learning, in whose halls that element may feel perfectly at 
home ; which, acknowledging a congenial sympathy, and har- 
monizing its mode of culture, with their characteristics and 
habits of thought, may atttract their general confldence and 
affection, and which, at the same time, by the munificence of 
its endowment, and the greatness of its capacity for instruction, 
will be equal to the duty of dispensing the highest mental cul- 
ture to the numbers, which that general regard and confidence 
will gather to its bosom. It requires nothing but the proper 
tribute from the overflowing wealth of Lancaster City and 
County, nothing but the exercise of an encouraging liberality 
on the part of our citizens, to enable Franklin and Marshall 
College to reach this high position, and fulfil this noble duty. 
It is formed by the union of two corporations, which have al- 
ways maintained an intimate connection and relation with this 
German element. By the terms of the diarter of Franklin 
College, its funds were expressly devoted to serving the cause 
of learning among the German part of our population. Mar- 
shall Cdfege, in the twenty years of its existence, had already 
gained a strong foothold in their affections and confidence ; by 
adapting its instruction to th^ peculiar genius, and faithfully 
devoting its energies to the awakening of their slumbering 
mental power. Ushered into existence, therefore, with such 
antecedents, the new College appeals to the dame element for 
support, and stands pledged to pursue the same ends and de- 
vote its energies to the same purposes. By the constitution 



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28^ 

ancT complexion of its faculty, by its public promise " to main- 
tain a lively communication with the literatiure and science,, 
the philosophy and religion of Germany,** and by the reign- 
ing spirit of its culture, it redeems those pledges, and now pre- 
sents itself to the State as the representative and exponent of 
an order of education which is the only one calculated to de- 
velop its capabilities in thek best form. The local advanta* 
ges of its situation are also eminent. Easy of access from all 
quarters by great high-ways of travel, healthy in its climate, 
with all the conveniences of Ufe largely and cheaply supplied, 
and possessing a rare combination of the benefits of city lifo 
with the delights of rural scenery in its most beautiful and fer- 
tile forms, the mere geographical position of the College is 
smpei?ior to that of any other in the State. But it is with 
reference to the peculiar character of the Institution that those 
advantages are most conspicuous, ^tuated in the heart of a 
pre-eminently German county, the industry and enterprise of 
whose population, their stem integrity of life and homely vir- 
tues, combined with their prosperity and abundant wealth, 
have made it the chief seat and centre of the German influence 
of the State, the College is thus placed on an eminence which 
eannot fail to attract the gaze and fasten the attention of tho 
whole Gennan population of America* 

These are some of the elements of success which make the 
dedication of these Halls, in which Franklin and Marshall 
College will henceforth pursue the purposes of its mission, an 
occasion /»Z7 of high hope and promise. A distinguished friend 
6f and laborer in the cause of education. Bishop Potter, has 
expressed the Opinion, that if we could blend the deep and 
Comprehensive thought, the speculative research and liberal en- 
thusiasm of Germany, with the active practical energy and the 
indomitable enterprise of the American character, we might 
inaugurate a form of culture nobler and more beneficent than 
the world has yet seen. This is the special object and pur- 
"pOBt pi the new College, and tl^ peculiarity of its mission,^ 
therefore, far from impairing its general usefulness, only enno^ 
bles the form of culture which it is prepared to confer upon 
all classes of our fellow citizens. And if it achieves complete 
success in this high mission, we may expect to witness such 



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effects upQn bot H individual and State character, as will draw 
to it the eyes of the whole nation, and render it one of the 
greatest and most influential institutions in the land. 

With such magnificent results within the boundaries of our 
vision, every feeling of philanthropy, every impulse of State 
and County pride forbid us to permit the experiment to Ian* 
guish or fail for want of material encouragement and support. 
Its success wiU redound largely to the honor and credit of our 
City and County, to the diffusicm of a taste for karning in our 
midst, to the exaltation of the tone of our society, and the ad- 
yancement of its material prosperity. To what benevolent 
object, then, can tiie superabundance of its wealth be applied, 
which, in the pleasing perception of its beneficial operation, will 
render a larger or more gratifying return ? What nobler or 
more endxuring fame can any one desire, than that of being a 
chief instrument in the accomplishment of such a destiny as is 
here promised ? No one can hope to enshrine his name in a 
more splendid monument, than this living one, which, by con- 
tinuing to confer blessings npon humanity, will perpetuate the 
memory of its builders, in the grateful recollections of coming 
generations. Private endowments and bequests to colleges are 
said to be things unknown in our State. But may we not with 
justice suppose, that this is owing to the fact that we have had 
no institution which from its wide sphere of influence and pros- 
pects of extended usefulness, seemed to be a worthy recipient 
of an enlarged and liberal bounty ? And may we not expect 
that now, when a fitting opportunity presents itself, our weal* 
thy oitizens will come to the asaistance of a college, which, with 
such efficient aid, cannot fail to become one of the leading in- 
stitutions of the country ! With the earnest hope that such 
just expectations may be realized, and with these visions of 
future grandeur floating around us, and consecrating this oc- 
casion, I again congratulate the community on their new pos- 
session, and recommend it to the ardent support and good 
will of every one before me, who cherishes in his bosom one 
spark of patriotic State or County pride^ 



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